Mint

Growing Guide

where_to_vote
Where to plant

Full sun/part shade.

save_alt
Sow depth

5mm

amp_stories
Space between seeds / seedlings

30-45cm

filter_list
Row space

30-45cm

select_all
Size of pot needed (width / depth)

40-60cm2

forward
Seedling Sow Depth

5cm

eco
Best practice

Transplant

lens
Germination (days)

10-14

lens
Maturity (days)

90

How to Grow

How to grow video guide
From seed

Sow outdoors in late spring or start seed indoors about eight to 10 weeks before the last frost.

Keep soil moist until the seed germinates.

Mint seed germinates in 10 to 15 days.

Seed-grown plants should reach harvestable size within two months.

You can start sowing mint seed in containers or in prepared garden soil.

Sow seeds 5mm deep.

The seeds are tiny, but you can space them with a seed injector or simply thin the seedlings once germinated.

Expect germination in 10 to 15 days.

Keep in a warm location and soil lightly moist but not soggy.

A cover over the mint tray can speed germination.

Remove it once you see sprouts.

If starting mint seeds outdoors, sow seeds on the surface of prepared soil and cover with a light layer of vermiculite.

Once seedlings have two sets of true leaves, harden them off and plant them into beds or outdoor containers.

Once the little plants are ready to transplant, take containers outdoors and let them acclimate for a week to outdoor conditions before moving them.

From seedling

Sow seedlings directly into the soil or container once seedlings have two sets of true leaves, harden them off and plant them into beds or outdoor containers.

Once the little plants are ready to transplant, take containers outdoors and let them acclimate for a week to outdoor conditions before moving them.

In a pot

Plant in a pot that is at least 30cm wide.

Fill with compost/potting mix.

Plant seeds 1mm deep, and seedlings 5mm deep.

Cover with soil, press soil around the base of the plant or top of the seed.

Water in well.

The seeds are tiny, but you can space them with a seed injector or simply thin the seedlings once germinated.

Expect germination in 10 to 15 days.

Keep in a warm location and soil lightly moist but not soggy.

A cover over the mint tray can speed germination.

Remove it once you see sprouts.

If starting mint seeds outdoors, sow seeds on the surface of prepared soil and cover them with a light layer of vermiculite.

Once seedlings have two sets of true leaves, harden them off and plant them into beds or outdoor containers.

Once the little plants are ready to transplant, take containers outdoors and let them acclimate for a week to outdoor conditions before moving them.

Ready to harvest

You can harvest the mint once the plant has multiple stems.

Harvest by taking leaves below the top 2.

Do not harvest more than 1/3 of the plant.

If you do not harvest your mint regularly, it will benefit greatly from a shearing mid-season.

At some point, you will probably notice the stems getting longer and the leaves getting shorter.

That is the time to cut the plants back by one-third to one-half.
This will encourage them to send out fresh new foliage again, with good sized leaves.

You can do small patches at a time, if you have a lot of mint, and prolong the harvest season.

Remember, all cuttings can be dried, frozen, or used later.

Collect seed

Wait until the mint flowerhead has dried then snip off and place in a plastic bag.

If you leave the flowerhead on the plant too long it may release the seeds on the ground.

This may be a problem if you prefer to keep your mint in pots.

When to Grow

grass

Zone 1 - Cool

January , February , March , April , May , June , July , August , September , October , November , December

grass

Zone 2 - Temperate

January , February , March , April , May , June , July , August , September , October , November , December

grass

Zone 3 - Subtropical

January , February , March , April , May , June , July , August , September , October , November , December

Companion Planting

Tips for Care

looks_one
There is not really much that mint needs besides moisture and rich soil.

It is pretty hard to kill a mint plant.
looks_two
Prune mint regularly to keep it contained and to stimulate new leaves.
looks_3
Cuttings of mint will root easily in soil or water and mature plants can be divided and transplanted.

And, you can always start new plants from seed.

Although, most mint plants are hybrids and will not grow from true seed.
looks_4
Mint can be aggressive, so it may be best to plant it in containers or in an out of the way area of the garden.

Alternatively, you can let it ramble around where human contact will release the oils and perfume the area with a heavenly scent.

Pests & Problems


shopping_cart